Hydrocodone Addiction

Dihydrocodeinone (more commonly known as Hydrocodone) is a semi-synthetic opioid derived from two of the naturally occurring codeine, thebaine, and opiates. Hydrocodone is an orally active antitussive and narcotic analgesic. It is normally presented in capsule, syrup, and tablet form and is regularly compounded with extra analgesics like ibuprofen or paracetomol. In the year 1920, Hydrocodone was synthesized in Germany and was permitted by the FDA under the brand name Hycodan on 23 March 1943 for sale in the United States.

What does Hydrocodone do?

Primarily, hydrocodone acts as a “block” to pain receptors in the brain, producing a euphoric and enjoyable sensation. The initial feeling is incredibly seldom recreated but the hydrocodone addict continues to try, and does so by increasing the quantity of hydrocodone they make use of and the rate of recurrence with which they use it. The only thing they administer to make is a larger forbearance to the drug, which causes consistent use leading to a hydrocodone obsession.

Why is Hydrocodone so addicting?

Hydrocodone addiction begins unknowingly enough. The tolerant takes prescribed hydrocodone for pain, the ache to some extent relieved and the user experiences a satisfying feeling. In an effort to totally alleviate the pain or to recreate this emotional pleasure, the individual increases their hydrocodone prescribed amount. The outcome is typically equivalent. The pain is never completely eliminated and the initial pleasurable feeling is never fully recreated. This leaves the client with an enlarged tolerance for the drug and addiction occurs.

Who is at risk?

Hydrocodone abuse is a growing trend in non-chronic pain anguish persons. The user of these drugs has been made recognized not only to the city youth, but can also be a famous actor, a suburban real estate representative, or your next door fellow citizen. First time misuse of these drugs has been surging, mainly with the Hydrocodone and oxycodone type painkillers. The two vary to some extent in their chemical composition but have a related effect on the body.

3 COMMENTS

  1. have tried to quit so many times I take 40 to 50 narco 10 a day I quit one time for 3 month’s then my little girl passed away she was 2 I found her dead in her room and I just lost in now I am worse then ever and I can’t get help i cant afford it but I don’t want to depend on a drug to get by see day by day I need help to get clean or I’m going to die from liver disease and my kids won’t have anyone

    • Since you have a computer to use, look for programs for recovery in your city that are covered by some public assistance. I live in a small town in the middle of Alaska and we have programs from several sources for substance abuse. I am so sorry for the loss of your daughter. You and your family will be in my prayers. I think you hit the nail on the head about the harm you are doing to your liver (from the acetaminophen). If you are taking 40/day at the low acetaminophen/hydrocodone dose (325/5) then that’s 13000 mg of acetaminophen. I believe an adult can not safely exceed 2000/day without liver compromise. You need to make recovery your #1 priority. You can’t be there for anyone else in your family if you don’t put yourself first. It is tough, but you will come out stronger. Going through this in your life will make you a better person. Whatever you do, don’t fall into the trap of shame making you want to escape your failures, it’s a vicious cycle. Between shame, depression and addiction, these internal and physical struggles work together to keep you using. That is why you need help from the outside. You need a support group that is familiar with addiction and recovery. I sincerely hope you will reach out to NA (narcotics anonymous) and/or Celibrate Recovery. People will be there to help you get into the right treatment facility for you as well as support you as you become clean and sober and, very importantly, beyond coming clean. You aren’t alone. That’s part of the sinister nature of the addiction is to tell you you are alone and not worthy. Don’t buy it. This is where the beauty of One Day at a Time comes to play. Although in truth, for most of us, we need one hour at a time and sometimes we can only process one moment at a time. You can do it. Baby steps, they’re not just for babies. 🙂 (When you want to laugh about this concept, watch the Bill Murray movie, “What About Bob”) I will pray for you and yours. Sincerely, Missy

  2. have tried to quit so many times I take 40 to 50 narco 10 a day I quit one time for 3 month’s then my little girl passed away she was 2 I found her dead in her room and I just lost in now I am worse then ever and I can’t get help i cant afford it but I don’t want to depend on a drug to get by see day by day I need help to get clean or I’m going to die from liver disease and my kids won’t have anyone

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